Global Workforce 2030: The Humans Behind the Machines

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Global Workforce 2030: The Humans Behind the Machines

PART ONE: BURNOUT

To keep up with technology, we humans have to work faster, harder, and better. Great for some, while for others, the digital age modus operandi is causing accelerated levels of workplace stress and burnout.

Last time I checked, Artificial Intelligence hasn’t taken over the world… um, yet (should place "scared face" emoji here), so, we still need healthy humans to run the show.

According to recent studies, one in five highly engaged employees is at risk of burnout. The American Institute of Stress claims that work-related stress costs the economy 300 billion each year. Work stress-producing practices consist of:

  • long working hours
  • the absence of job-related control
  • not having regular and predictable work hours
  • work vs. family disputes
  • lack of health insurance

Stressed employees are more likely to quit and managing turnover is not cheap.

Through the years, I've read multiple studies that have indicated a direct link between "giving people control over how and when they do their jobs" and "an increase in motivation and engagement."

Some of the companies leading a path to healthy change include Google, SAS Institute, and Patagonia. These companies provide a template for healthy workplace actions to include:

  • people taking time off are expected to use it
  • people do not send emails or text messages after work hours or on weekends
  • people are not micromanaged and as long as they deliver, can decide how and when they accomplish tasks

Questions to consider:

Will employees of the future select their place of employment solely on salary and promotion opportunities or also on psychological and physical health? And, how are you managing workplace stress and burnout?

Would very much like to hear your views. Please share your thoughts in the comments section.

(c) 2018 Arun Baharani Consulting. All rights reserved.

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ASIA TRAVEL JOURNAL: In 2018, Tackle Global Workforce Fears

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ASIA TRAVEL JOURNAL: In 2018, Tackle Global Workforce Fears

Approaches to help you deal with one of the most important global leadership challenges in the new year.

In the 2018 global digital workplace, your offshore teams have been experiencing some trepidation and uncertainty regarding their space in the world of international employment. This is a realty I’m seeing and feedback I’m receiving from global teams in Asia and it’s not a topic that can be shelved for later consideration. The important question a leader must consider is how important is my offshore team to my business. If the answer is they are an integral part of your operational success, then the changes in offshore hiring practices, immigration policies and limited long-term employment growth opportunities are going to require you as a leader to exhibit the necessary competencies and skills to successfully manage and retain future global talent.

Now more than ever, leaders have to guide and support their international employees regarding changes in employment regulations and market changes in the allocation of onshore and offshore talent. To be ahead of the seismic workforce shifts that are occurring, a radical transformation in thinking regarding the language of global collaboration to include corporate policies and procedures for managing and retaining exceptional talent across borders will be a requirement. This is the first step toward global team success in 2018 and in upcoming years and decades.

In times of uncertainty and change, the number one criterion for a healthy global work environment is for leaders to exhibit courage and empathy. Being an empathetic leader is not a negative attribute; it is a much required management technique that can help foster team belonging, international team engagement, employee productivity and long-term profitability. A University of New South Wales study with 5,600 people form seventy-seven organizations found empathy to be key attributes for leaders. The ability of leaders to spend time and effort managing fear and welcoming feedback to include criticism and fostering cooperation among staff was the single greatest influence on organizational profitability and productivity.

One of the sessions I facilitate for my clients is “Coaching Global Employees for Long-Term Success.” The objective of the session is for leaders to develop the coaching skills to demonstrate that they have their employees’ best interests in mind. Leaders in the session acquire the coaching methods to encourage their offshore staff to build the competencies required to be successful global partners and future international managers. The session provides leadership guidance and support skills necessary in times of uncertainty. As a global leader, is providing guidance to your onshore and offshore teams a priority? Here are four questions for consideration:

  1. Are employee fears and concerns regarding global immigration policies being addressed?
  2. Are you promoting open dialogue and support for employee concerns and questions regarding the impact of changes in immigration policies (example in the USA and United Kingdom) on future job opportunities?
  3. Do you have a guidance and support strategy for the career goals of your onshore and offshore employees and does the organization include a revised 2018 international employee growth strategy?
  4. In light of ever-changing global employment policies, are you encouraging learning and new skill building opportunities and career growth steps that will help your employees want to stick around and reach their full potential?

(c) 2018 Arun Baharani Consulting. All rights reserved.

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